Thanks to this COVID-19 thing I have been spending a lot more time on the internet and a lot less time working. For the most part I just mope around, but every once in a while I find something interesting. That is what got me started on this particular ship, the Russian Cruiser Aurora or as it is known in Russia, Авро́ра.

Seen here in 1903, the “Авро́ра” was originally built by the Russian Empire.

Originally laid down in 1897 and finally completed in 1900, the Aurora was a cruiser that served with the Imperial Russian fleet out of Kronstadt as part of the Baltic Fleet. After three years of training, trials, and refit, the vessel was commissioned in 1903 and was immediately embarked on journey from the Baltic Sea to Asia in order to fight in the Russo-Japanese War.

While she did see some conflict, she spent most of the war interned in the Philippines by the USA. She would not have any significant engagements until 1917 when she was part of initial battles of the Soviet October Revolution that brought an end to the Russian Empire and ushered in the age of Communism.

Because of the role that she played in bringing about Communism, she became a symbol of the Soviet Union and gained massive popularity in the USSR and Russia that would endure. In fact, it is that enduring popularity that brought about my attention.

The image below features a model wearing a (likely) tourist recreation Captain 1st Class’s Hat emblazoned with the ship’s name and a naval telnyashka, the traditional Russian/Soviet military undershirt:

This was the image that caught my attention and made me want to learn more about the Russian ship “Авро́ра.”

If you have any great interest in the ship or about learning more of her history, it is currently still a commissioned ship that serves as a floating museum in St. Petersburg. You can visit the next time you are allowed to travel:

Know a cool ship? Is there some specific content you want? Have some feedback? Well, you could let me know…


References:
https://en.wikipedia.org
https://www.google.com/maps
https://yaustal.com/